Blog

  • Larger Print Liturgical Year 2

    We have reprinted Dom Gueranger's Liturgical Year in a larger size than the original.

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  • Fasting and Prayer

    Prayer to say, when fasting or doing some other acts of mortification.

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  • Novenas to the Blessed Virgin

    Commenting on making Novenas to the Blessed Virgin Mary, Saint Alphonsus writes:The servants of Mary are very attentive and fervent in celebrating the Novenas of her Feasts; and during these the holy Virgin, full of love, dispenses to them innumerable and special blessings.

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  • A Sacred Vow

    A new book, 'The Benedict Option', calls us to live differently than we have been living.

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  • The Benedict Option

    'The Benedict Option' calls for living as true Christians rather than compromising with the world or getting entangled in fights that have already been lost. The author appeals for a new Saint Benedict to arise. Let us become Benedictine ourselves, following the simple maxim of Saint Benedict to pray and to work. We pray that the books published here will be helpful in teaching us the Christian Way of Life.

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  • Out of the Office

    Our staff will be away from July 30 to August 7. Also our phone is for

    information only. We are unable to take credit card orders over the

    phone.

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  • On the Purpose of Sinning No More

    Sorrow and a purpose of amendment necessarily go together. "A sorrow of the soul, and a detestation of sin," says the Council of Trent, "along with a purpose of sinning no more." (Sess. 14, cap. iv.) The soul cannot have a true sorrow for sin without a sincere purpose never more to offend God. Now, in order to be a true purpose, it must have three conditions; it must be firm, universal, and efficacious.

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  • How the Devil Works in Sin and Confession

    St Antonine relates that a certain prelate once saw a devil beside a woman at confession.

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  • Imprimatur

    Are your books imprimatured?

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  • On the Power of Confirmation

    Julian the Apostate wished one day to offer sacrifice to his false gods, and had everything prepared; but, at the moment they wished to offer the sacrifice, the knives refused to cut, the fire was instantly extinguished, and the ministers became immovable as a rock. ...

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  • Volume Discounts

    We give discounts on large orders.

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  • Devotion to the Sacred Heart Is Older Than You Think

    When we think of devotion to the Sacred Heart, we think of Saint

    Margaret Mary. However, before her came Saint John Eudes, (17th

    century) who the Roman Breviary says was the author of devotions to the

    Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary. Saint Mechtilde

    (13th century) wrote Love of the Sacred Heart.

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  • The Pope And His Mother

    The pope and his humble mother.

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  • The Little Way of Spiritual Childhood

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  • How Christ Said the First Mass

    The Last Supper was the First Mass. The sacrifice of the Paschal Lamb prefigured the Mass.

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  • Brother Lawrence on Kindle

    Brother Lawrence is also available on Kindle.

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  • Safeguarded by Moderation

    In striving for temperance in eating and drinking, we have Our Lord's example of penance, sobriety, abstinence and mortification to inspire us; likewise the example of the Saints, who often practiced heroic abstinence

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  • Gluttony part 2

    Unfortunately, drunkenness is not confined to the male sex, as it was notably in former years, but has become a common vice also among women, in whom it seems all the more degrading.

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  • The Last Passover

    Anyone who truly wishes to appreciate the Latin Mass and its origin in the Mass Jesus said at the Last Supper should read this book. It also becomes clear that the Jews of Jesus' time had every reason to convert, when one sees how the Mass fulfills prophecy so well. We are extremely happy to bring this excellent book back into print. WORLDLY people look with wonder at the Mass, and often say: "what is the meaning of this form of divine worship? Where did these ceremonies come from? Why are candles lighted during daytime? Why do the priests wear such peculiar robes? "Why don't they say the service in a language the people can understand?" The Catholic sometimes says to himself: "The Mass came from the Last Supper. But did Christ or the apostles say Mass as priest or bishop of our time? Did Christ that night follow any form of worship? If he did, where is it found? From ancient days the Church used the Ordinary of the Mass, but we do not know its origin." Many questions rise in people's minds to which they find no answer. A common opinion holds that Christ said the First Mass at the Last Supper according to a short form of blessing and prayer, then consecrated the bread and wine, gave the apostles Communion, and preached the sermon John's Gospel gives. When the apostles said Mass, they recited some Psalms, read the Scriptures, preached a sermon, consecrated the bread and wine, recited the Lord's Prayer and then gave Communion. In the apostolic age the saints added other prayers and ceremonies. Afterwards Popes and councils still more developed the rites, composed new prayers, and that during the Middle Ages the Mass grew and expanded into the elaborate Liturgy and Ceremonial of our day. But these opinions are wrong. From the beginning the Mass was said according to a long Liturgy and with ceremonies differing little from those of our time. No substantial addition was made after the apostolic age what the early Popes did was of minor importance-revisions and corrections. Little addition was made to the Ordinary of the Mass handed down from the days of Peter, founder of our Latin Liturgy.

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  • Gluttony

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  • The Clock of the Passion

    Saint Augustine says, that there is nothing more conducive to the

    attainment of eternal salvation, than to think every day on the pains

    which Jesus Christ has suffered for the love of us.
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  • Be cordial and kind, gentle and lowly; considerate towards others, severe upon yourself

    To begin with, virtue is not virtue unless it is lovable: where it is not, it is imperfect. And its imperfection is due to self-love and self-esteem. When humility has dried up these two sources of all our shortcomings and evil habits, then virtue reveals itself in all its loveliness, and men cannot help but pay it homage, even though they may not show it. For virtue causes us to render to others the feelings we entertain for ourselves, so that what would be unwarrantable self-love in our own case becomes praiseworthy charity when directed towards others. It leads us to do to others as we would be done by; to think and speak, and even suffer from them, as we would have them act in our regard. Certainly no one could refuse the tribute of his love for such a virtue when he sees it in others, and all men would love one another if they were virtuous.

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  • Urgent Message for Catholic Families!

    Husband and wife have a solemn responsibility to love and care for each other and for their children. ‘Children are an heritage of the Lord’ (Psalms 127:3).

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  • Ask And You Shall Receive

    “Thanks so much for the books! I can read the text without my glasses! And I am now reading the gospel commentaries to my husband as bedtime stories!"

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  • Mother Angelica RIP

    Mother Angelica said: “Where most men work for degrees after their names, we work for one before our name, Saint.”

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  • Free shipping

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  • Ash Wednesday

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