Blog

  • Safeguarded by Moderation

    In striving for temperance in eating and drinking, we have Our Lord's example of penance, sobriety, abstinence and mortification to inspire us; likewise the example of the Saints, who often practiced heroic abstinence

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  • Gluttony part 2

    Unfortunately, drunkenness is not confined to the male sex, as it was notably in former years, but has become a common vice also among women, in whom it seems all the more degrading.

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  • The Last Passover

    Anyone who truly wishes to appreciate the Latin Mass and its origin in the Mass Jesus said at the Last Supper should read this book. It also becomes clear that the Jews of Jesus' time had every reason to convert, when one sees how the Mass fulfills prophecy so well. We are extremely happy to bring this excellent book back into print. WORLDLY people look with wonder at the Mass, and often say: "what is the meaning of this form of divine worship? Where did these ceremonies come from? Why are candles lighted during daytime? Why do the priests wear such peculiar robes? "Why don't they say the service in a language the people can understand?" The Catholic sometimes says to himself: "The Mass came from the Last Supper. But did Christ or the apostles say Mass as priest or bishop of our time? Did Christ that night follow any form of worship? If he did, where is it found? From ancient days the Church used the Ordinary of the Mass, but we do not know its origin." Many questions rise in people's minds to which they find no answer. A common opinion holds that Christ said the First Mass at the Last Supper according to a short form of blessing and prayer, then consecrated the bread and wine, gave the apostles Communion, and preached the sermon John's Gospel gives. When the apostles said Mass, they recited some Psalms, read the Scriptures, preached a sermon, consecrated the bread and wine, recited the Lord's Prayer and then gave Communion. In the apostolic age the saints added other prayers and ceremonies. Afterwards Popes and councils still more developed the rites, composed new prayers, and that during the Middle Ages the Mass grew and expanded into the elaborate Liturgy and Ceremonial of our day. But these opinions are wrong. From the beginning the Mass was said according to a long Liturgy and with ceremonies differing little from those of our time. No substantial addition was made after the apostolic age what the early Popes did was of minor importance-revisions and corrections. Little addition was made to the Ordinary of the Mass handed down from the days of Peter, founder of our Latin Liturgy.

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  • Gluttony

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  • The Clock of the Passion

    Saint Augustine says, that there is nothing more conducive to the

    attainment of eternal salvation, than to think every day on the pains

    which Jesus Christ has suffered for the love of us.
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  • Be cordial and kind, gentle and lowly; considerate towards others, severe upon yourself

    To begin with, virtue is not virtue unless it is lovable: where it is not, it is imperfect. And its imperfection is due to self-love and self-esteem. When humility has dried up these two sources of all our shortcomings and evil habits, then virtue reveals itself in all its loveliness, and men cannot help but pay it homage, even though they may not show it. For virtue causes us to render to others the feelings we entertain for ourselves, so that what would be unwarrantable self-love in our own case becomes praiseworthy charity when directed towards others. It leads us to do to others as we would be done by; to think and speak, and even suffer from them, as we would have them act in our regard. Certainly no one could refuse the tribute of his love for such a virtue when he sees it in others, and all men would love one another if they were virtuous.

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  • Urgent Message for Catholic Families!

    Husband and wife have a solemn responsibility to love and care for each other and for their children. ‘Children are an heritage of the Lord’ (Psalms 127:3).

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  • Ask And You Shall Receive

    “Thanks so much for the books! I can read the text without my glasses! And I am now reading the gospel commentaries to my husband as bedtime stories!"

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  • Mother Angelica RIP

    Mother Angelica said: “Where most men work for degrees after their names, we work for one before our name, Saint.”

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  • Free shipping

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  • Ash Wednesday

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